Thursday, 3 November 2011

Malaysia Tourism | Malaysia Map

Malaysia Tourism | Malaysia Map

About Malaysia:

Malaysia is a federal constitutional monarchy in Southeast Asia. It consists of thirteen states and three federal territories and has a total landmass of 329,847 square kilometres (127,350 sq mi) separated by the South China Sea into two regions, Peninsular Malaysia and Malaysian Borneo. Land borders are shared with Thailand, Indonesia, and Brunei, and maritime borders exist with Singapore,Vietnam, and the Philippines. The capital city is Kuala Lumpur, while Putrajaya is the seat of the federal government. In 2010 the population exceeded 27.5 million.

Malaysia has its origins in the Malay Kingdoms present in the area which, from the 18th century, became subject to the British Empire. The first British territories were known as the Straits Settlements, with the other states forming protectorates. The states on Peninsular Malaysia, then known as Malaya, was first unified as the Malayan Union in 1946. Malaya was restructured as the Federation of Malaya in 1948, and achieved independence on 31 August 1957. Malaya united with Sabah, Sarawak, and Singapore on 16 September 1963, with 'si' being added to give the new country the name Malaysia. However, less than two years later in 1965, Singapore was expelled from the federation. Since independence, Malaysia has had one of the best economic records in Asia, with GDP growing an average 6.5% for almost 50 years. The economy has traditionally been fuelled by its natural resources, but is expanding in the sectors of science, tourism, commerce and medical tourism.

The head of state is the Yang di-Pertuan Agong, an elected monarch chosen from the hereditary rulers of the nine Malay states every five years. The head of government is the Prime Minister. The government system is closely modelled on the Westminster parliamentary system and the legal system is based on English Common Law. The country is multi-ethnic and multi-cultural, factors that influence its culture and play a large role in politics. Islam is the state religion, although freedom of religion is protected by a secular constitution.

Malaysia contains the southernmost point of continental Eurasia, Tanjung Piai, and is located near the equator and has a tropical climate. It has a biodiverse range of flora and fauna, and is considered a megadiverse country. It is a founding member of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations and the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation, and a member of Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation, the Commonwealth of Nations, and the Non-Aligned Movement.

Geography of Malaysia:

Malaysia is the 66th largest country by total land area, with a land area of 329,847 square kilometres (127,355 sq mi). It has land borders with Thailand in West Malaysia, and Indonesia and Brunei in East Malaysia. It is linked to Singapore by a narrow causeway, and also has maritime boundaries with Vietnam and the Philippines. The land borders are defined in large part by geological features such as the Perlis River, Golok River and the Pagalayan Canal, whilst some of the maritime boundaries are the subject of ongoing contention. Brunei forms what is almost an enclave in Malaysia, with the state of Sarawak dividing it into two parts. Malaysia is the only country with territory on both the Asian mainland and the Malay archipelago, and Tanjung Piai, located in the southern state of Johor, is the southernmost tip of continental Asia. The Strait of Malacca, lying between Sumatra and Peninsular Malaysia, is one of the most important thoroughfares in global commerce, carrying 40 per cent of the world's trade.

The two parts of Malaysia, separated from each other by the South China Sea, share a largely similar landscape in that both West (Peninsula) and East Malaysia feature coastal plains rising to hills and mountains. Peninsular Malaysia, containing 40 per cent of Malaysia's land area, extends 740 kilometres (460 mi) from north to south, and its maximum width is 322 kilometres (200 mi). It is divided between its east and west coasts by the Titiwangsa Mountains, part of a series of mountain ranges running down the centre of the peninsula. These mountains are heavily forested, and mainly composed of granite and other igneous rocks. Much of it has been eroded, creating a karst landscape. The range is the origin of some of Peninsular Malaysia's river systems. The coastal plains surrounding the peninsula reach a maximum width of 50 kilometres (31 mi), and the peninsula's coastline is nearly 1,931 kilometres (1,200 mi) long, although harbours are only available on the western side.

East Malaysia, on the island of Borneo, has a coastline of 2,607 kilometres (1,620 mi). It is divided between coastal regions, hills and valleys, and a mountainous interior. The Crocker Range extends northwards from Sarawak, dividing the state of Sabah. It is the location of Mount Kinabalu. Mount Kinabalu, at 4,095.2 metres (13,436 ft), is the tallest mountain in Malaysia and is protected as Kinabalu National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The highest mountain ranges form the border between Malaysia and Indonesia. Sarawak contains the Mulu Caves, the largest cave system in the world.

Around these two halves of Malaysia are numerous islands, the largest of which is Labuan. The local climate is equatorial and characterised by the annual southwest (April to October) and northeast (October to February) monsoons. The temperature is moderated by the presence of the surrounding oceans. Humidity is usually high, and the average annual rainfall is 250 centimetres (98 in). The climates of the Peninsula and the East differ, as the climate on the peninsula is directly affected by wind from the mainland, as opposed to the more maritime weather of the East. Local climates can be divided into three regions, highland, lowland, and coastal. Climate change is likely to affect sea levels and rainfall, increasing flood risks and leading to droughts.

Malaysia Weather:

Malaysian Culture:

Malaysia is a multi-ethnic, multicultural and multilingual society. The original culture of the area stemmed from indigenous tribes that lived there, along with the Malays who later moved there. Substantial influence exists from Chinese and Indian culture, dating back to when foreign trade began in the area. Other cultures that heavily influenced the culture of Malaysia include Persian, Arabic, and British culture. Due to the political structure of the government, coupled with the social contract theory, there has been minimal cultural assimilation of ethnic minorities.

In 1971, the government created a "National Cultural Policy". This policy defined Malaysian culture, stating that it must be based on the culture of the indigenous peoples of Malaysia, it may incorporate suitable elements from other cultures, and that Islam must play a part in Malaysian culture. It also promoted the Malay language above others. This government intervention into culture has caused resentment among non-Malays who feel their cultural freedom was lessened. Both Chinese and Indian associations have submitted memorandums to the government, accusing it of formulating an undemocratic culture policy.

Some cultural disputes exist between Malaysia and neighbouring countries, notably Indonesia. The two countries share a similar cultural heritage, sharing many traditions and items. However, disputes have arisen over things ranging from culinary dishes to Malaysia's national anthem. Strong feelings exist in Indonesia about protecting their national heritage. The Malaysian government and the Indonesian government have met to defuse some of the tensions resulting from the overlaps in culture. Feelings are not as strong in Malaysia, where most recognise that many cultural values are shared.

Fine arts:

Traditional Malaysian art was mainly centred around the areas of carving, weaving, and silversmithing. Traditional art ranges from handwoven baskets from rural areas to the silverwork of the Malay courts. Common artworks included ornamental kris, beetle nut sets, and woven batik and songket fabrics. Indigenous East Malaysians are known for their wooden masks. Each ethnic group have distinct performing arts, with little overlap between them. However, Malay art does show some North Indian influence due to the historical influence of India.

Traditional Malay music and performing arts appear to have originated in the Kelantan-Pattani region with influences from India, China, Thailand and Indonesia. The music is based around percussion instruments,the most important of which is the gendang (drum). There are at least 14 types of traditional drums. Drums and other traditional percussion instruments and are often made from natural materials. Music is traditionally used for storytelling, celebrating life-cycle events, and occasions such as a harvest. It was once used as a form of long-distance communication. In East Malaysia, gong-based musical ensemble such as agung and kulintang are commonly used in ceremonies such as funerals and weddings. These ensembles are also common in neighbouring regions such as in the southern Philippines, Kalimantan in Indonesia, and Brunei. Johor state on the south of Peninsular Malaysia has an apparent Arab and Persian influence in art performances like Zapin and Hamdolok, musical instruments like Gambus and Samrah.

Malaysia has a strong oral tradition that has existed since before the arrival of writing, and continues today. Each of the Malay Sultanates created their own literary tradition, influenced by pre-existing oral stories and by the stories that came with Islam. The first Malay literature was in the Arabic script. The earliest known Malay writing is on the Terengganu stone, made in 1303. Chinese and Indian literature became common as the numbers of speakers increased in Malaysia, and locally produced works based in languages from those areas began to be produced in the 19th century. English has also become a common literary language. In 1971, the government took the step of defining the literature of different languages. Literature written in Malay was called "the national literature of Malaysia", literature in other bumiputra languages was called "regional literature", while literature in other languages was called "sectional literature". Malay poetry is highly developed, and uses many forms. The Hikayat form is popular, and the pantun has spread from Malay to other languages.

Malaysian cuisine:

Malaysia's cuisine reflects the multi-ethnic makeup of its population. Many cultures from within the country and from surrounding regions have greatly influenced the cuisine. Much of the influence comes from the Malay, Chinese, Indian, Thai, Javanese, and Sumatran cultures, largely due to the country being part of the ancient spice route. The cuisine is very similar to that of Singapore and Brunei, and also bears resemblance to Filipino cuisine. The different states have varied dishes, and often the food in Malaysia is different from the original dishes.

Sometimes food not found in its original culture is assimilated into another; for example, Chinese restaurants in Malaysia often serve Malay dishes. Food from one culture is sometimes also cooked using styles taken from another culture, This means that although much of Malaysian food can be traced back to a certain culture, they have their own identity. Rice is popular in many dishes. Chili is commonly found in local cuisine, although this does not necessarily make them spicy.

Holidays and festivals:

Malaysians observe a number of holidays and festivities throughout the year. Some are federally gazetted public holidays and some are observed by individual states. Other festivals are observed by particular ethnic or religion groups, and the main holiday of each major group have been declared a public holiday. The most observed national holiday is Hari Merdeka (Independence Day) on 31 August, commemorating the independence of the Federation of Malaya in 1957. Malaysia Day on 16 September commemorates federation in 1963. Other notable national holidays are Labour Day (1 May), and the King's birthday (first week of June).

Muslim holidays are prominent as Islam is the state religion; Hari Raya Puasa (also called Hari Raya Aidilfitri, Malay for Eid al-Fitr), Hari Raya Haji (also called Hari Raya Aidiladha, the translation of Eid ul-Adha), Maulidur Rasul (birthday of the Prophet), and others being observed. Malaysian Chinese celebrate festivals such as Chinese New Year and others relating to traditional Chinese beliefs. Hindus in Malaysia celebrate Deepavali, the festival of lights, while Thaipusam is a religious rite which sees pilgrims from all over the country converge at the Batu Caves. Malaysia's Christian community celebrates most of the holidays observed by Christians elsewhere, most notably Christmas and Easter. East Malaysians also celebrate a harvest festival known as Gawai. Despite most of the festivals being identified with a particular ethnic or religious group, celebrations are participated by all Malaysians in a custom known as "open house".

Tourism in Malaysia  | Tourist Attractions in Malaysia

Kuala Lumpur:

Kuala Lumpur is the capital and the second largest city in Malaysia by population. The city proper, making up an area of 243 km2 (94 sq mi), has a population of 1.4 million as of 2010.Greater Kuala Lumpur, also known as the Klang Valley, is an urban agglomeration of 7.2 million. It is the fastest growing metropolitan region in the country, in terms of population and economy.

Kuala Lumpur is the seat of the Parliament of Malaysia. The city was once home to the executive and judicial branches of the federal government, but they have since moved to Putrajaya starting in 1999. Some sections of the judiciary remain in the capital. The official residence of the Malaysian King, the Istana Negara, is also situated in Kuala Lumpur. Rated as an alpha world city, Kuala Lumpur is the cultural, financial and economic centre of Malaysia due to its position as the capital as well as being a primate city.

Kuala Lumpur is defined within the borders of the Federal Territory of Kuala Lumpur and is one of three Malaysian Federal Territories. It is an enclave within the state of Selangor, on the central west coast of Peninsular Malaysia. Residents of the city are colloquially known as KLites.

Since the 1990s, the city has played host to many international sporting, political and cultural events including the 1998 Commonwealth Games and the Formula One World Championship. In addition, Kuala Lumpur is home to the tallest twin buildings in the world, the Petronas Twin Towers, which have become an iconic symbol of Malaysia's futuristic developments.

Petronas Towers:

The Petronas Towers are skyscrapers and twin towers in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. According to the CTBUH's official definition and ranking, they were the tallest buildings in the world from 1998 to 2004 until surpassed by Taipei 101, but remain the tallest twin buildings in the world surpassing the World Trade Center. The building is the landmark of Kuala Lumpur with nearby Kuala Lumpur Tower.

George Town:

George Town is the capital of the state of Penang in Malaysia. Named after Britain's King George III, George Town is located on the north-east corner of Penang Island.The Georgetown metropolitan has a population of 1,253,748, the second largest metropolitan in Malaysia by population.

Formerly a municipality and then a city in its own right, since 1976 George Town has been part of the municipality of Penang Island, though the area formerly governed by the city council is still commonly referred to as a city, and is also known as Tanjung ("The Cape") in Malay and (Qiáozhì Shì) in Chinese.


Labuan is a federal territory in East Malaysia. It is an island off the coast of the state of Sabah. Labuan's capital is Victoria and is best known as an offshore financial centre offering international financial and business services via Labuan IBFC since 1990 as well as being an offshore support hub for deepwater oil and gas activities in the region. It is also a tourist destination for nearby Bruneians and scuba divers. The name Labuan derives from the Malay word labuhan meaning anchorage.

Penang Island:

Penang Island is part of the state of Penang, on the west coat of Peninsular Malaysia. It was named Prince of Wales Island when it was occupied by the British East India Company on 12 August 1786, in honour of the birthday of the Prince of Wales, later King George IV. The capital George Town, was named after the reigning King George III.

Malaysia has another island called "Pulau Pinang", which is a diving site located in South China Sea and part of the Johor Marine Park, which consists a group of islands: Pulau Aur, Pulau Dayang, Pulau Lang, and Pulau Pinang itself.

Redang Island:

Redang Island, locally known as Pulau Redang or just "Redang" is one of the largest islands off the east coast of Malaysia. It is one of nine islands, which form a marine park, and which offer snorkeling and diving opportunities. Access is from Merang or Kuala Terengganu on boats operated by the resorts; there is also a small airport with services operated by Berjaya Air from Singapore (Seletar Airport) and Kuala Lumpur (Sultan Abdul Aziz Shah Airport).

The island is also an important conservation site for sea turtles. Previously, the indiscriminate economic exploitation of turtle eggs had caused fewer turtles returning to nest on the island. This has led the Terengganu state government to set up the Koperasi Setiajaya Pulau Redang in 1989, a cooperative aiming to develop and manage socio-economic programmes that could improve the livelihood of Pulau Redang locals without endangering its natural resources.

Tunku Abdul Rahman National Park:

The Tunku Abdul Rahman Marine Park comprises a group of 5 islands located between 3 to 8 km off Kota Kinabalu. The park is spread over 4,929 hectares, two thirds of which cover the sea. Before the Ice Age, it formed part of the Crocker Range mass of sandstone and sedimentary rock on the mainland. However, about one million years ago, the melting ice brought about changes in the sea level and parts of the mainland were cut off by the sea to form the islands of Gaya Island, Sapi Island, Manukan Island, Mamutik Island and Sulug Island. Evidence of this can be seen from the exposed sandstone of the coastline forming the cliffs, caves, honeycombs and deep crevices.

Jesselton Point Ferry Terminal in downtown Kota Kinabalu is the ferry terminal for those heading to the islands in Tunku Abdul Rahman Marine Park (Gaya Island, Sapi Island, Manukan Island, Mamutik Island and Sulug Island). This ferry terminal is also the departure point for patrons staying at either Manukan Island Resort or Gayana Resort.

Teluk Cempedak:

Teluk Cempedak or Teluk Chempedak (literally : Jackfruit Bay) is a famous beach in Kuantan, Pahang, Malaysia. Teluk Cempedak is located 5 kilometres east from the town centre in Kuantan and is situated in close proximity to the Royal Pahang Golf Club. The white sandy beach and the beautiful casuarinas and pine trees line the coast, with some rocky promontories facing the incessant waves of the South China Sea. All these combined to make the beach serene and at the same time delightful. You can see the boats of the fishermen at sea during the day, and the twinkling lights of their boats at night. The fishing village of Tanjung Api and Beserah is only about 5 km away on either side of Teluk Chempedak.

Perhentian Islands:

The Perhentian Islands (Pulau Perhentian in Malay) lie approximately 10 nautical miles (19 km) off the coast of northeastern Malaysia in the state of Terengganu, approximately 40 miles (64 km) south of the Thai border.

The two main islands are Perhentian Besar ("Big Perhentian") and Perhentian Kecil ("Small Perhentian"). The small, uninhabited islands of Susu Dara (Virgin Milk), Serenggeh and Rawa lie off Kecil. The Perhentians belong to Pulau Redang National Marine Park, which means that fishing, collecting coral and littering are strictly prohibited. Like Besut, people here generally speak Kelantanese Malay.

Tioman Island:

Tioman Island (locally known as Gunung Daik Bercabang Tiga) is a small island located 32 km off the east coast of Peninsular Malaysia in the state of Pahang, and is some 39 km long and 12 km wide. It has eight main villages, the largest and most populous being Kampung Tekek in the north. The densely forested island is sparsely inhabited, and is surrounded by numerous coral reefs, making it a popular scuba diving spot. There are also a lot of resorts and chalets around the island which has duty free status.

Its beaches were depicted in the 1958 movie, South Pacific as Bali Hai. In the 1970s, TIME Magazine selected Tioman as one of the world's most beautiful islands.

Apart from its diverse marine life, the inland rainforest area, encompassing approximately 12,383 hectares, in Tioman is a strictly enforced nature reserve. There are several protected species of mammals on the island, including the Binturong, Long-tailed Macaque, Slow Loris, Black Giant Squirrel, Red Giant Flying Squirrel, Mouse deer, Brush-tailed Porcupine, and Common Palm Civet, from a total of 45 species of mammals and 138 species of birds, including the majestic Frigatebird. Moreover, Tioman has species that are endemic to its shores. The soft-shelled turtle and the Tioman walking catfish are both unique and can be seen on rainforest walks.

Bako National Park:

Bako National Park, established in 1957, is the oldest national park in Sarawak, eastern Malaysia, on the island of Borneo. It covers an area of 27.27 square kilometres (10.53 sq mi) at the tip of the Muara Tebas peninsula at the mouth of the Bako and Kuching Rivers. It is approximately 40 kilometres (25 mi) by road from Kuching. Millions of years of erosion of the sandstone have created a coastline of steep cliffs, rocky headlands and stretches of white, sandy bays. Wave erosion at the base of the cliffs has carved many of the rocky headlands into fantastically shaped sea arches and seastacks with colored patterns formed by iron deposition. Some of these rock formations can be seen on entry to the Teluk Assam Beach, which fronts the park. The park can only be reached by a 20-minute boat ride from the village of Kampung Bako. It is often visited as a day-trip from Kuching, though accommodations (campground and forestry service bungalows) are available.

Bako is one of the smallest national parks in Sarawak, yet one of the most interesting, with multiple biomes (including rainforest), abundant wildlife, jungle streams and waterfalls, secluded beaches, and trekking trails. A network of 16 marked walking trails of different lengths allows visitors access. In addition, various beaches are accessible by boat from Kampung Bako or Teluk Assam, as well as a geologically interesting sea stack rock formation. The range of attractions and activities in a compact area have made Bako one of the most popular parks in Sarawak.

Mount Kinabalu:

Mount Kinabalu is a prominent mountain on the island of Borneo in Southeast Asia. It is located in the East Malaysian state of Sabah and is protected as Kinabalu National Park, a World Heritage Site. Kinabalu is the tallest peak in Borneo's Crocker Range and is the fourth tallest mountain in the Malay Archipelago after Papua's Puncak Jaya, Puncak Trikora and Puncak Mandala. Mount Kinabalu is also the 20th tallest mountain in the world by topographic prominence.

In 1997, a re-survey using satellite technology established its summit (known as Low’s Peak) height at 4,095 metres (13,435 ft) above sea level, which is some 6 metres (20 ft) less than the previously thought and hitherto published figure of 4,101 metres (13,455 ft).

Mount Kinabalu includes the Kinabalu montane alpine meadows ecoregion in the montane grasslands and shrublands biome. The mountain and its surroundings are among the most important biological sites in the world, with over 4500 species of plant, 326 species of birds, and 100 mammalian species identified. Among this rich collection of wildlife are famous species such as the gigantic Rafflesia plants and the orangutan. Mount Kinabalu has been accorded UNESCO World Heritage status.

Low's Peak can be climbed quite easily by a person in good physical condition and there is no need for mountaineering equipment at any point on the main route. Other peaks along the massif, however, require rock climbing skills.

Taman Negara National Park:

Taman Negara was established in Malaysia in 1938/1939 as the King George V National Park. It was renamed to Taman Negara after independence, which literally means "national park" in Malay. Taman Negara (total area 4,343 km²) has a reputation as the world's oldest tropical rainforest.

Taman Negara encompasses three states, Pahang, Kelantan and Terengganu, each with its own legislation. The Taman Negara Enactment (Pahang) No. 2 of 1939 is enforced in the state of Pahang, the Taman Negara Enactment (Kelantan) No. 14 of 1938 in the state of Kelantan and the Taman Negara Enactment (Terengganu) No. 6 of 1939 in the state of Terengganu. The enactments have similar contents.

Taman Negara Pahang is the largest at 2,477 km², followed by Taman Negara Kelantan at 1,043 km² and Taman Negara Terengganu at 853 km².

The park has been developed into a famous ecotourism destination in Malaysia. There are several geological and biological attractions in the park. Gunung Tahan is the highest point of the Malay Peninsula; climbers can use Kuala Tahan or Merapoh as their departure point. Taman Negara is the home of some rare mammals, such as the Malayan Tiger, Crab-eating macaque, Sumatran Rhinoceros, Great Argus, Red Junglefowl, Malayan Gaur (seladang) and Asian Elephant. Among the birdlife, the rare Malayan Peacock-pheasant is still found here in some numbers. Tahan River
has been preserved to protect the Malaysian mahseer (ikan kelah in Malay), a type of game fish.

Others attractions found near Kuala Tahan (Park headquarters for Pahang) include a canopy walkway, Gua Telinga (cave system), Lata Berkoh (rapid). Visitors can enjoy the tropical rain forest, birdwatching or jungle trekking (e.g. Tenor Rentis) and the river views along the Tahan River.

All visitors to the park must get permits from the Department of Wildlife and National Parks. There are many hostels and hotels nearby.

Endau Rompin National Park:

Endau Rompin National Park is a protected tropical rainforest in Malaysia. It is an area south of the state of Pahang and to the northeast of Johor covering an approximate area of 870 km², effectively making it is the second largest national park in Peninsular Malaysia after Taman Negara, with approximately 26 km of trail. It is the second national park proclaimed by the government of Malaysia.

The park is one of the oldest tropical rainforest complexes in the world and features rock formations some 248 million years old. Apart from that, the park contains the largest remaining population of the threatened Sumatran rhinoceros species on the Malay Peninsula. Gunung Besar which is the second highest in Johor is located in the park.

The park takes it name from the Endau and Rompin rivers that flow through the park. Other rivers that flow through the parks are Segamat, Selai and Jasin.

During the monsoon season that covers from November till March, the park is closed to the public. Further, fishing is banned from September till October during mating season.

Batu Caves:

Batu Caves is a limestone hill, which has a series of caves and cave temples, located in Gombak district, 13 kilometres (8 mi) north of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. It takes its name from the Sungai Batu or Batu River, which flows past the hill. Batu Caves is also the name of the nearby village.

The cave is one of the most popular Hindu shrines outside India, dedicated to Lord Murugan. It is the focal point of Hindu festival of Thaipusam in Malaysia.

Berjaya Times Square:

Berjaya Times Square Kuala Lumpur is a twin tower complex containing a shopping centre and five star hotel located in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. It was opened in October 2003 by the then Prime Minister of Malaysia, YAB Datuk Seri Dr Mahathir bin Mohamad. Both towers are 203 metres (666 ft) tall, with 48 floors.

It is currently the fifth largest building in the world and has also been tagged as the "world's largest building ever built in a single phase", with 7.5 million square feet (700,000 m²) of built up floor area. It offers shopping, luxury accommodation, business, food and entertainment. Currently, it has space for more than 1,000 retail shops, 1,200 luxury service suites, 65 food outlets to suit many tastes and entertainment attractions such as Asia's largest indoor theme park, Berjaya Times Square Theme Park (formerly Cosmo’s World Theme Park) and Malaysia's first-ever GSC MAXX (formerly IMAX) 2D & 3D theatre which is located on the 10th Floor. In April 2005, Borders Group opened its first franchise store here which is currently the largest Borders store in the world. However due to the 2010 economic downturn it has since been downsized into a smaller operation called Borders Express.

The Kuala Lumpur Monorail's Imbi station is linked to the building by a footbridge.

Crystal Mosque:

The Crystal Mosque or Masjid Kristal is a mosque in Kuala Terengganu, Terengganu, Malaysia. The mosque is located at Islamic Heritage Park on the island of Wan Man. The mosque was constructed between 2006 and 2008. It was officially opened on 8 February 2008 by 13th Yang di-Pertuan Agong, Sultan Mizan Zainal Abidin of Terengganu.

However, in a newspaper report of Bernama, on October 26th 2008, the Minister in the Prime Minister's Department Datuk Seri Dr Ahmad Zahid Hamidi commented on this building having Chinese characteristics and called on the people to not be cynical about these types of mosques and focus more on the teachings of Islam. He said this because of concern on the Malay people not wanting to share mosque characteristics with the Muslim-Chinese people.

Bukit Bintang:

Bukit Bintang (stylized as Bintang Walk or Starhill) is the name of the shopping and entertainment district of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. It encompasses Jalan Bukit Bintang and its immediate surrounding areas. The area has long been Kuala Lumpur's most prominent retail belt that is home to many landmark shopping centres, al-fresco cafés, swanky bars, night markets, as well as hawker-type eateries. This area is popular among tourists and locals, especially among the youths. A part of Bintang Walk is designated as an "Arab Street".

Kuala Lumpur Bird Park:

Kuala Lumpur Bird Park is a 20.9-acre (8.5 ha) public aviary in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. It is a popular tourist attraction in the country, receiving an average of 200,000 visitors every year. It is located adjacent to the Lake Gardens. The Bird Park houses more than 3000 birds representing more than 200 species, in an enclosed aviary. Out of these birds, 90% are local birds and 10% were imported from overseas.

Kuala Lumpur Tower:

The Kuala Lumpur Tower is a tall tower located in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Its construction was finished in 1995. It is used for communication purposes and features an antenna that reaches 421 m (1,381 ft), which currently makes it the second tallest freestanding tower in the world. The roof of the pod is at 335 m (1,099 ft). The rest of the tower below has a stairwell and an elevator to reach the upper area, which also contains a revolving restaurant, providing diners a panoramic view of the city. Races are organised yearly where participants race up the stairs to the top. The tower also acts as the Islamic falak observatory to observe the crescent moon which marks the beginning of Muslim month of Ramadhan, Syawal, and Zulhijjah, to celebrate fasting month of Ramadhan, Hari Raya Aidilfitri and Aidiladha. The tower is the landmark of Kuala Lumpur with nearby Petronas Towers.

Sultan Salahuddin Abdul Aziz Mosque:

The Sultan Salahuddin Abdul Aziz Shah Mosque is the state mosque of Selangor, Malaysia. It is located in Shah Alam. It is the country's largest mosque and also the second largest mosque in Southeast Asia after Istiqlal Mosque in Jakarta, Indonesia. Its most distinguishing feature is its large blue and silver dome. The mosque has four minarets, one erected at each of the corners.

National Zoo of Malaysia:

The National Zoo is a zoo in Malaysia located on 110 acres (45 ha) of land in Ulu Klang, near Taman Melawati, in north-east Kuala Lumpur. It was officially opened on 14 November 1963. The park is managed by a non-governmental organization known as the Malaysian Zoological Society. For funding, Zoo Negara relies on gate collections and on support from donors and sponsors.

Zoo Negara is home to 5137 animals of 459 different species. Over the years, the zoo has transformed itself to an open concept zoo with over 90% of its animals kept in spacious exhibits with landscape befitting its nature.

Zoo Negara received MS ISO 9001:2008 certification in July 2007, and is a member of the South East Asian Zoos Association (SEAZA). The President and chairman of the zoo is Y. Bhg. Dato’ Ismail Hutson.

Suria KLCC:

Suria KLCC is Malaysia's premier shopping centre located at the base of the Petronas Twin Towers in Kuala Lumpur City Centre based in Kuala Lumpur. It is located on 6 floors, with anchor tenants Isetan, Parkson Grand, Cold Storage Supermarket, Tanjong Golden Village, Signature's Level 2 Food Court and Marks and Spencer. Suria is the native Malay word derived from Sanskrit 'surya' for Sunshine. It was officially innaugurated opened on 31 August 1999.

It houses mostly luxury and fashionable shops such as Aigner, Louis Vuitton, Moschino, Prada, Brioni, Marc Jacobs, Hermes, Salvatore Ferragamo, Frank Muller, Bally, Coach, Hugo Boss, Karen Millen, Paul Smith, Fendi, Piaget, Miu Miu, Calvin Klein, Stuart Weitzman, Gucci, Chopard, Versace, Emilio Pucci, Burberry, Chanel, Tod's, Giorgio Armani, Emporio Armani, Ermenegildo Zegna, Rolex, Alfred Dunhill, DKNY, Jimmy Choo as well as cafes, restaurants, a 12 screen cinema, a concert hall, an art gallery, and a Science Discovery Centre, over 6 floors. It is nestled below the Petronas Twin Towers, the tallest twin towers in the world. It is one of Malaysia's most popular tourist destinations.

Transport in Malaysia:

Transport in Malaysia started to develop during British colonial rule, and the country's transport network is now diverse and developed. Malaysia's road network is extensive, covering 63,445 km, including 1,630 km of expressways. The main highway of the country extends over 800 km, reaching the Thai border from Singapore. The network of roads in Peninsular Malaysia is of high quality, whilst the road system in East Malaysia is not as well developed. The main modes of transport in Peninsular Malaysia include buses, trains, cars and to an extent, airplanes.

Malaysia has six international airports. The official airline of Malaysia is Malaysia Airlines, providing international and domestic air service alongside two other carriers. Most of the major cities are connected by air routes. The railway system is state-run, and covers a total of 1798 km, in Peninsula Malaysia only. Popular within the cities is Light Rail Transit, which reduces the traffic load on other systems, and is considered safe, comfortable and reliable.


Malaysia's road network covers 98,721 kilometres (61,342 mi), of which 80,280 kilometres (49,884 mi) is paved, and 1,821 kilometres (1,132 mi) is expressways. The longest highway of the country, the North-South Expressway, extends over 800 kilometres (497 mi) between the Thai border and Singapore. The road systems in Sabah and Sarawak are less developed and of lower quality in comparison to that of Peninsular Malaysia. Driving on the left has been compulsory since the introduction of motorcars in Federated Malay States in 1903 during British colonial era.


The railway system is state-run, and covers a total of 1,849 kilometres (1,149 mi). 1,792 kilometres (1,113 mi) of it is narrow gauge, while 57 kilometres (35 mi) is standard gauge. 150 kilometres (93 mi) of narrow gauge tracks and all of the standard gauge tracks are electrified. Relatively inexpensive elevated Light Rail Transit systems are used in some cities, such as Kuala Lumpur.


Malaysia has 7,200 kilometres (4,474 mi) of waterways, most of them rivers. Of this, 3,200 kilometres (1,988 mi) are in Peninsular Malaysia, 1,500 kilometres (932 mi) are in Sabah, and 2,500 kilometres (1,553 mi) are in Sarawak.

Hotels in Malaysia:

5 Star Hotels in Malaysia:

Swiss Inn Kuala Lumpur
Tune Hotels - Downtown KL
Mayview Glory Hotel
Hotel Grand Crystal Kedah
Suria Cherating Beach Resort
Mayangsari Resort Dungun
Theme Park Hotel Genting Highlands
Fair Park Hotel Ipoh
Heritage Hotel Ipoh
Regalodge Hotel Ipoh
Dorsett Johor Hotel
Tropical Inn Johor Bahru
Mayres Hotel Johor
Merang Suria Resort
Hotel Grand Continental Kuantan

4 Star Hotels in Malaysia:

Suria Hill Country House Bentong
Hillview Inn Cameron Highlands
Suria Cherating Beach Resort
Hotel Malaya Kuala Lumpur
RUEMZ Hotel Subang Jaya
My City Hotel Petaling Street
Mayview Glory Hotel
City Villa Kuala Lumpur
Langkawi Seaview Hotel
Aldy Hotel Melaka
TM Resort Fraser Hill
Red Rock Hotel Penang
Felda Residence Hot Springs
Hotel Sandakan
King Park Hotel Tawau

3 Star Hotels in Malaysia:

YYK 1 Borneo Condominium
Kiansom Villa Kota Kinabalu
Nadias Inn Comfort Langkawi
Holiday Inn Melaka
Hotel Seri Malaysia Melaka
Hotel Seri Malaysia Taiping
Swiss Inn Sungai Petani
Hotel Seri Malaysia Seremban
The LimeTree Hotel Kuching
Penview Hotel Kuching
Noble Hotel Kuala Lumpur
Hotel Sentral Kuala Lumpur
Hotel Capitol Kuala Lumpur
Empress Hotel Sepang

Cheap-Budget Hotels in Malaysia:

Hotel China Town Inn
Garden City Hotel
Family Hotel Malaysia
Mayview Glory Hotel
Eighty-Eight Inn (88 Inn)
Chill Inn
V La Court Hotel
D'Oriental Inn
Star Castle
Hotel Chinatown 2
Comfort Inn Sdn Bhd
Hotel Sabrina
My City Hotel
Cube Hotel
Etika Inn
Phoenix Hotel

Malaysia Pictures:

  Malaysia Map:

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